Skip to main content

Full text of "Bridgewater State College : undergraduate/graduate catalogue"

See other formats


BRIDGEWATER 

STATE COLLEGE 



I 



Supplement to the 

1987-1988 
UNDERGRADUATE/GRADUATE 
CATALOGUE 



For More Information . 



President 697-1201 

Academic Advising 697-1214 

Academic Affairs 697-1295 

Administration and Finance 697-1207 

Admissions 697-1237 

Affirmative Action/Minority Affairs 697-1241 

Athletics 697-1352 

Career Planning & Placement 697-1328 

Graduate School 697-1300 

Program of Continuing Education 697-1264 

Registrar's Office 697-1231 

Student Financial Aid 697-1341 

Student Housing 697-1277 

Student Services 697-1276 

Department of Art 697-1359 

Department of Biological Sciences 697-1358 

Department of Chemical Sciences 697-1233 

Department of Earth Sciences & Geography 697-1390 

Department of Economics 697-1387 

Department of Elementary & Early Childhood Education 697-1243 

Department of English 697-1258 

Department of Foreign Languages 697-1279 

Department of Health, Physical Education & Recreation 697-1215 

Department of High School, Middle School & Adult Education 697-1320 

Department of History 697-1388 

Department of Management Science & Aviation Science 697-1395 

Department of Mathematics & Computer Science 697-1342 

Department of Media & Librarianship 697-1370 

Department of Music 697-1377 

Department of Philosophy & Religious Studies 697-1379 

Department of Physics 697-1386 

Department of Political Science 697-1387 

Department of Psychology 697-1385 

Department of Social Work 697-1389 

Department of Sociology & Anthropology 697-1355 

Department of Special Education 697-1226 

Department of Speech Communication, Theatre Arts & 

Communication Disorders 697-1348 




POLICY ON NON-DISCRIMINATION AND AFFIRMATIVE ACTION 

As part of the Massachusetts Public Higher Education System, Bridgewater State College is 
committed to a policy of non-discrimination and affirmative action in its educational 
programs, activities, and employment practices. It is the policy of the College not to 
discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, national origin, age, religion, or handicap. In 
fulfillment of the requirements of Executive Orders 1 1246 and 1 1375, Titles IV, VI, VII, IX and 
X of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended in 1972, and all pertinent Laws, Regulations, and 
Executive Directives of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and other applicable state and 
federal statutes. Inquiries concerning the College's compliance with Affirmative Action 
programs may be addressed to Assistant to the President, Affirmative Action/Minority 
Affairs, Bridgewater State College, Bridgewater, MA 02325. Telephone (508) 697-1241, or 
write to the Office for Civil Rights, Washington, D.C. 



Undergraduate Admissions 



The information contained in the 1987-1988 Catalog is amended as follows: 

Decision and Notification Dates 

Early Decision: 

If Bridgewater State College is your first choice for college study, you may 
apply for Early Decision. For the applicant, Early Decision eliminates several 
months of waiting for an admission decision. A student under the Early 
Decision Plan must agree to withdraw applications from all other colleges if 
admitted to Bridgewater. This program is only for Freshman applicants for the 
Fall semester. 

Candidates for Early Decision should file their application and all supporting 
documents no later than November 15. You will receive a decision letter by 
December 15 and, if admitted, will have until January 15 to return your 
admission deposit. 

Regular Decision: 

Freshman applicants for the Fall semester must submit their completed 
application by March 1. Notification of the Admissions Committee's decision 
will be mailed between April 1 and April 15. 

A limited number of freshmen candidates are accepted for the Spring 
semester each year. The application deadline is December 1 and decisions are 
mailed by early January. 

Interviews 

Interviews are not required; however, any student wishing a personal 
interview may contact the Admissions Office for an appointment. 

Intended Area of Study 

As of the Fall of 1989, Undergraduate Programs leading to provisional 
certification in teaching at the Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary 
levels will require students to declare a major in liberal arts and sciences or an 
appropriate interdisciplinary major, and to take a broad distribution of liberal 
arts courses. Forthcoming regulations will define the majors that are 
appropriate for prospective teachers. 



1 



The Graduate School 



For detailed information regarding the catalogue changes indicated below, 
students are urged to contact the Graduate School Office or the appropriate 
department at the College. The Graduate Office is located in the Conant 
Science Building, Room 211, and is open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday 
through Friday. The Office also may be reached by calling (508) 697-1300. 

Teacher Certification 

Certification of education personnel is no longer offered through post 
bachelor's non-degree certification programs. Liberal arts graduates who wish 
to be certified must be admitted by the Graduate School to an appropriate 
Master of Arts in Teaching or Master of Education program. Persons who have 
already earned a master's degree may pursue certification in certain areas 
through the Graduate School's Certification of Advanced Graduate Study 
(CAGS) in Education program. 

In order to be eligible for institutional endorsement at Bridgewater State 
College, students must complete the program by May 1992. Students 
completing their certification program after May 1992 will have to complete any 
additional requirements under new guidelines for the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 

Students interested in one of the following certificates should contact the 
Graduate School for admission information: 



Classroom Teaching 
Certificates: 

Early Childhood Teacher (K-3) 
Elementary Teacher (1-6) 
Teacher of Art (5-12) 
Teacher of Behavioral Sciences (9-12) 
Teacher of Biology (9-12) 
Teacher of Chemistry (9-12) 
Teacher of Drama (5-12) 
Teacher of Earth Sciences (9-12) 
Teacher of English (9-12) 
Teacher of French (9-12) 
Teacher of Geography (9-12) 
Teacher of Health (K-9, 5-12) 
Teacher of History (9-12) 
Teacher of Mathematics (9-12) 



Teacher of Physical Education (K-9, 5-12) 
Teacher of Physics (9-12) 
Teacher of Social Studies (9-12) 
Teacher of Spanish (9-12) 

Additional Certificates 

Counsulting Teacher of Reading (K-12) 
School Guidance Counselor (N-9, 5-12) 
School Principal (N-6, 5-9, 9-12) 
Superintendent/ Assistant Super- 
intendent (All Levels) 
Supervisor/Director (Various Levels) 
Teacher of Children with Moderate 

Specials Needs (N-9) 
Unified Media Specialist (N-9, 5-12) 



School Adjustment Counselor Certification 

Students interested in seeking certification through the Department of 
Youth Services as a school adjustment counselor should contact the counseling 
program coordinator. Dean Martha Jones for details. 

Master of Arts in Biology and English Program Revisions 

Course and program requirements in the Master of Arts in Biology and 
English programs have changed. For details contact the appropriate 
department and the Graduate School. 



2 



Tuition and Fees* 



Semester Tuition (as of September, 1988) 

Residents of Massachusetts (Undergraduate): 

Full-time (12 or more credits) — per semester $507.00 

Part-time — per credit hour $42.25 

Non-residents of Massachusetts (Undergraduate): 

Full-time (12 or more credits) — per semester $1,755.00 

Part-time — per credit hour $146.25 

Residents of Massachusetts (Graduate): 

Full-time $573.00 

Part-time (per credit hour) $47.75 

Non-Residents of Massachusetts (Graduate): 

Full-time $1,815.00 

Part-time (per credit hour) $151.25 

Tuition and certain fees are not charged to any person 60 years of age or 
older. 

Required Semester Fees 

Campus Service Fee (as of January 1989) $195.00 

Student Government Association Fee $24.00 

Port-time students are charged one-half of the above fees. 

Other Fees 

Physical Education Facilities Fee required of all new students $12.00 

Placement Fee required of all new students $10.00 

Student I.D. Card Fee required of all new students $ 5.00 

Residence Hall Security Deposit $50.00 

Late Registration Fee (nonrefundable) $25.00 

Commencement Fee $11.00 

Day session underclassmen are billed at $2.50 a year; 

seniors at $3.50; transfer students assessed retroactively; 

all others at time of graduation. 

Student Teaching Fee (in lieu of Educational Services Fee) $75.00 

Student Health Insurance Plan (Optional) 

(Family Plans Available) $114.00 

Transcript Charge (Day School - per copy) $ 1.00 

Semester Room and Board 

Room — per semester 

Residence Halls $740.00 

Resident Student Apartments $885.00 

Board — per semester 

19 meal plan (Fall, 1988) $575.00 



*All charges are subject to change. 



3 



Revised Academic Programs 



Undergraduate Majors and Concentrations are currently offered in: 



ANTHROPOLOGY 

(one may concentrate in): 
Cultural Anthropology 
Public Anthropology 
ART 

(one may concentrate in): 

Graphic Arts 

Crafts 

Fine Arts 
AVIATION SCIENCE 

(choose one concentration): 

Flight Training 

Aviation Management 
BIOLOGY 
BUSINESS - see 

Management Science 
CHEMISTRY 

PROFESSIONAL CHEMISTRY 
(one may concentrate in): 
Biochemistry 
CHEMISTRY-GEOLOGY 
COMMUNICATION ARTS & 
SCIENCES 

(choose one concentration): 
Speech Communication 
Theatre Arts 

Communication Disorders 
COMPUTER SCIENCE 
EARLY CHILDHOOD 

EDUCATION 
EARTH SCIENCES 

(one may concentrate in): 

Geology 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

(one may concentrate in): 

Middle School Education 
ENGLISH 

(one may concentrate in): 

Writing 
FRENCH 
GEOGRAPHY 
HISTORY 

(one may concentrate in): 

Community History 

Military History 
MANAGEMENT SCIENCE 

(choose one concentration): 

General Management 



Energy & Environmental 
Resources 

Finance & Accounting 

Marketing 

Transportation 

Information Systems 
Management 
MATHEMATICS 
PHILOSOPHY 

(one may concentrate in): 

Applied Ethics 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

(choose one concentration): 

Athletic Training 

Coaching 

Exercise Science/ 
Health Fitness 

Health 

Motor Development Therapy/ 
Adapted Physical Education 
Programs for Children and 
Youth 

Recreation 
PHYSICS 

(choose one concentration): 

Computer Electronics 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

(one may concentrate in): 

Public Administration 

International Affairs 

Legal Studies 
PSYCHOLOGY 

(one may concentrate in): 

Industrial-Personnel 
Psychology 

Medical Psychology 
SOCIAL WORK 
SOCIOLOGY 

(one may concentrate in): 

Criminology 

Third World Studies 
SPANISH 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 



4 



undergraduate minors are 

American Studies 

Anthropology 

Art 

Art History 
Aviation Science 
Biochemistry 
Biology 

Canadian Studies 

Chemistry 

Coaching 

Communication Disorders 
Computer Science 
Dance 

Earth Sciences 

Economics 

Elementary Art (K-9) 

English 

French 

Geophysics 

Geography 

German 

Health 

High School Education* 
History 

Instructional Media 
Italian 



currently oiiered in: 

Library Science 



Linguistics 

Management Science 

Mathematics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Physical Science 

Physics 

Political Science 
Portuguese 
Psychology 
Public Relations 
Radio and Television 

Operation and Production 
Recreation 
Religious Studies 
Russian 

Russian & East European Studies 

Scientific Illustration 

Social Welfare 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Special Education 
Speech Communication 
Theatre Arts 
Urban Affairs 
Women's Studies 



*Students who wish to become junior high school or high school teachers elect a minor in 
High School Education and a major from one of the major fields offered. This minor 
requires more than 21 hours in order to satisfy Massachusetts certification standards. 

Graduate programs are currently offered in: 



Master of Arts (M.A) 

Biology 
Chemistry 

Communication Studies 

English 

History 

Humanities 

Psychology 

Master of Arts in 
Teaching (M.A.T.) 

Behavioral Sciences 
Biology 
Creative Arts 
Chemical Sciences 
Earth Sciences 
English 

Foreign Languages 

Geography 

History 

Humanities 

Mathematics 

Physical Sciences 

Physics 

Social Sciences 
Speech Communication 

and Theatre Arts 
Please see the Graduate School Section 
concerning newly approved programs. 



Master of Education 
(M.Ed.) 

Counseling 

Early Childhood Education 
Elementary Education 
Elementary School Mathematics 
Health Promotion 
Instructional Media 
Reading 

School Administration 
School Librarianship 
Special Education 

Master of Science (M.S.) 

Computer Science 
Physical Education 

Certificate of Advanced 
Graduate Study (C.A.G.S.) 

Behavioral Sciences 
Creative Arts 
Education 

Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics 
University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst Collaborative 
Doctor of Education Program 

of this publication for information 



Information on 
New General Education Requirements 



Students who are accepted for matriculation as freshman on or after 
September 1987 and transfer and readmitted students accepted on or after 
September 1989 will follow the new General Education Program outlined below. 
Specific courses which may be used to satisfy these requirements are 
listed. Please note that Introduction to Library Resources must be completed 
within the first 30 credits at Bridgewater; the Speaking requirement must be 
satisfied within the first 60 credits; and all GER's should be completed within 
the first 90 credits taken at Bridgewater State College. In addition, all students 
must satisfy the state-mandated Constitution requirement and demonstrate 
proficiency in writing by successfully completing the College's writing 
proficiency examination. 

Courses fulfilling the new General Education Requirements: 



1. Writing 

EN 101-102 Writing I, Writing II 

2. Speaking 

CC 130 Human Communications Skills 

3. Philosophy/Religion 



6 credits 
3 credits 
3 credits 



PL 110 Reasoning and Value 

PL 120 Reasoning and Human Nature 

PL 130 Reasoning and Politics 

PL 150 Reasoning and Science 

PR 120 Philosophy, Religion and Moral Issues 

PR 130 Religion, Reason and Revelation 

PR 170 Theology and Religion 

4. Locating and Processing Information 1 credit 

ML 102 Introduction to Library Resources 

5. History 6 credits 

(Only one course may be in American History) 

HI 111 Western Civilization to 1715 

HI 112 Western Civilization Since 1715 

HI 121 The Ancient World 

HI 124 The World Since 1815 

HI 221 U.S. History and Constitutions to 1865 

HI 222 U.S. History and Constitutions Since 1865 

6. Literature 3 credits 

EN 211 Literary Classics of Western Civilization to 1600 

EN 212 Literary Classics of Western Civilization Since 1600 

EN 214 The Classic Tradition 

EN 221 Major British Writers to 1800 

EN 222 Major British Writers Since 1800 

EN 231 Major American Writers to 1865 

EN 232 Major American Writers Since 1865 

EN 251 Literary Themes 

EN 252 Literary Types 



7. 



Artistic Modes of Expression 



6 credits 



(2 different disciplines, at most one studio) 

AR 101 Introduction to Art 

AR 102 Introduction to Arcliitecture 

AR 112 Introduction to Studio Art (Studio) 

AR 125 Drawing I (Studio) 

AR 130 Two-Dimensional Design (Studio) 

AR 140 Three-Dimensional Design (Studio) 

AR 201 Art Survey: Prehistoric, Ancient and Medieval 

AR 202 Art Survey: Renaissance, Baroque, and Modern 

AR 203 American Art and Architecture 

AR 214 Art History Study Tour 

CT 110 Theatre Appreciation 

CT 115 Play Production 

CT 146 Dance Appreciation 

ME 152 Basic Photography (Studio) 

MU 130 Voice Class I (Studio) 

MU 140 Class Piano I (Studio) 

MU 160 Music: A Listening Approach 

MU 161 American Music of Twentieth Century 

MU 167 Music of Black Americans 

MU 170 Music Fundamentals 

MU 240 Class Piano II (Studio) 

8. Physical and Biological Sciences 6 credits 

(Two courses from two different disciplines) 
(One must be a lab course, indicated by *) 

BI 100 General Principles of Biology* 
BI 102 Introduction to Zoology* 

BI 110 Biology: A Human Approach (new title as of Fall 1988) 

(formerly Humans and their Role in Nature) 

BI 112 Biology and Human Thought 

BI 113 Fundamentals of Biology 

BI 114 Horticulture 

BI 115 The Microbial World and You 

BI 116 Drugs of Plant Origin 

BI 117 The Biological Environment 

BI 118 Evolution 

BI 272 Animal Behavior 

CH 102 Chemistry in Everyday Life 

CH 111 The Art of Chemical Inquiry* 

CH 131 General Chemistry* 

CH 141 Chemical Principles I* 

ES 100 Physical Geology* 

ES 102 History of the Earth 

ES 194 Environmental Geology 

GE 100 Physical Geography* 

GE 120 The Physical World 

GE 196 Environmental Geography 

PH 100 Physics in the Natural World* 

PH 102 Modern Physics for the Humanist 

PH 180 Energy and its Social Uses 

PH 181 Elements of Physics I* 

PH 243 General Physics I* 



7 



9. Behavioral and Social Sciences 



9 credits 



(2 from AN, PY, SO and 1 from EC, GS, PO) 

AN 100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 
AN 101 Introduction to Physical Anthropology 
AN 103 Introduction to Archaeology 

AN 105 Culture Change (1987-88 year only. Deleted as ot y/88) 

AN 110 Introduction to Folklore 

AN 111 Myth and Culture 

PY 100 Introductory Psychology 

SO 102 Introduction to Sociology 

SO 103 Social Problems 

SO 108 Sociology of Religion 

SO 212 Discrimination and Prejudice 

SO 219 Population and Society 

EC 101 Principles of Microeconomics 

EC 102 Principles of Macroeconomics 

GS 110 Human Geography 

GS 170 Regional Geography of the Developed World 

PO 100 Introduction to Politics 

PO 172 American Government: The Federal System 

PO 260 International Relations 

PO 274 Western Political Thought 

10. Systematic Study of a Foreign Language 0/3/6 credits 

(Students must pass a course at the second semester level 
or place out of one.) 

LC 101-102 Elementary Chinese I-II 

LE 101-102 Elementary English as a Second Language I-II 

LF 101-102 Elementary French I-II 

LG 101-102 Elementary German I-II 

LP 101-102 Elementary Portuguese I-II 

LR 101-102 Elementary Russian I-II 

LS 101-102 Elementary Spanish I-II 

LT 101-102 Elementary Italian I-II 

11. Mathematics 3 credits 

MA 101 Calculus I 

MA 103 Elements of Calculus I 

MA 105 Selected Topics in Mathematics 

12. Non-Western Civilizations 3 credits 

(not within one's major) 

AN 104 Global Human Issues 

AN 206 Native Cultures of North America 

AN 208 Anthropology of Women 

AN 209 People and Cultures of Africa 

AN 213 Latin American Peoples and Cultures 

AR 205 Far Eastern Art 

CT 222 Asian Theatre 

GS 160 Geography of Non-Western Cultures 
MU 162 Music in African Culture 
PL 206 Liberation Ethics 
PR 252 Philosophies of India 
PR 253 Philosophies of China and Japan 

8 



PY 200 Non- Western Theories of Personality 

RE 150 Arabia, Muhammed and Islam 

RE 170 Middle Eastern Islamic Literature 

RE 199 Comparative Religion: Eastern 

RE 210 Women and Third World Religions 

RE 230 Afro-American Religion 

SO 104 Global Human Issues 

SO 210 Society and Culture in Modern India 

SO 214 Islamic Societies of the Middle East 

SO 217 East Asian Societies: China & Japan 

SO 220 Sociology of the Third World 

SO 221 Religion and Society in Modern Asia 

In addition, students must fulfill the state-mandated requirement in U.S. and 
Massachusetts Constitutions. This can be satisfied by: 

HI 221 U.S. History and Constitutions to 1865 

HI 222 U.S. History and Constitutions since 1865 (effective Fall 1988) 
PO 172 American Government: The Federal System (effective Fall 1988) 
PO 273 U.S. and Massachusetts Constitutions 
PO 277 American Government: State and Local (effective Fall 1988) 



9 



New Course Offerings* 



Department of Art (Page 81) 

AR 338/339 Honors Tutorial in Art (3 crs.) 

Special topics in art. Open to All-College and Departmental Honors students. Three 
hourly meetings weekly. (Prerequisite: Consent of Departmental Honors Committee) 

AR 485 Honors Thesis in Art (3 crs.) 

This course is open to All-College and Departmental Honors students. One-hour weekly 
meetings with the thesis director will culminate in a thesis comprising both artworks and 
a written corollary. With the consent of the Departmental Honors committee and the 
thesis director, this course may be extended into a second semester for three additional 
credits depending upon the scope of the project. Whether the final version of the thesis 
qualifies the student to graduate with honors will be determined by the Departmental 
Honors Committee, who will review the results as presented by the student. 
(Prerequisites: AR 338, and consent of the Departmental Honors Committee) 

Department of Biological Sciences (Page 87) 

BI 506 Advanced Cell Biology (3 crs.) 

This course will focus on various aspects of cellular regulation. Topics will include: 
Control of transcription in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells, mechanisms of protein 
synthesis and degradation, cellular responses to external factors. The approach will 
involve examination of these and other areas of cellular physiology at the molecular level. 
(Prerequisites: BI 200, BI 321, BI341, CH 344, CH 461 (recommended), or consent of 
Instructor) 

BI 508 Advanced Population Biology (3 crs.) 

This course offers an advanced coverage of population biology. Population biology 
encompasses all investigations above the level of the individual. Population biology is the 
study of the structure, integration and evolution of groups of organisms belonging to one 
or m.ore species. Included are considerations of intrapopulational phenomena, 
interactions between populations and community and ecosystem interactions. Population 
genetics and population ecology will be considered in detail. In the development of a 
unified theory of populations considerations will be given to other disciplines such as 
ethology, paleontology, environmental physiology, demography, and systematics. Two 
lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. 

BI 509 Advanced Physiology (3 crs.) 

A more detailed covering of basic physiological principles such as enzyme function, 
movement in cells: Amoeboid, Ciliary, Muscular, Cellular Communication; Synaptic, 
Hormonal, Growth and Aging. Extensive use of the literature such as reporting on papers 
in each area will be performed by each student. Two hours of lecture and one two-hour 
laboratory per week. (Prerequisites: BI 100, CH 131 & 132, BI 200 and a Ph^^siology 
course) 

BI 510 Mechanisms in Development (3 crs.) 

The student will come to understand in this course what is currently known about the 
major processes that occur when a single-cell zygote develops into a complex organism. 
Cell differentiation, differential gene expression and cell interaction are major topics in the 
course. (Prerequisites: BI 100, BI 321, CH 131 & 132) 

BI 521 Advanced Cellular and Molecular Techniques (3 crs.) 

This course provides in depth laboratory experience along with background theory for 
selected techniques such as: transformation with plasmid; isolation, purification and assay 
of macromolecules; tissue and cell culture; and radioisotopic technique. One lecture and 
four hours of laboratory weekly. (Prerequisites: BI 200, BI 321, BI 373, CH 344 or consent 
of Instructor) 

*Page numbers following course titles correspond with the departmental listings in the 
1987-88 College Catalogue. 



10 



BI 532 Ultrastructurc (3 crs.) 

A comparison of representative plant, animal and fungal cellular ultrastructure. After 
fixation, embeddment, sectioning and staining of sections from each group, students will 
be expected to obtain photographs exhibiting cellular organelles, mitotic and meiotic 
events, and tissue structures showing major features of each. Literature study of methods 
and interpretation of micrographs. (Prerequisites: BI 200 and/or BI 433) 

BI 551 Advanced Mycology (3 crs.) 

Aspects of growth, physiology, morphogenesis and genetics of representative fungi as 
related to fungal evolution and ecology. Two lectures and one two-to-four hour laboratory 
period weekly. (Prerequisites; BI 200, BI 321, BI 344, BI 428 or consent of Instructor) 

BI 573 Advanced Vertebrate Biology (3 crs.) 

This course covers the major vertebrate classes. Emphasis is placed on the systematics, 
distribution, behavior, reproduction, growth and development, natural history and 
ecology of vertebrates. Primary literature in Vertebrate biology will be covered and 
students will research a topic of their choice. This course will combine topics from the 
fields of Ichthyology, Herpetology, and Mammalogy. Two hours of lecture and one two- 
hour laboratory per week. (Prerequisites: An undergraduate course in vertebrate biology, 
animal morpholog}^ or comparative vertebrate anatomy) 

BI 582 Neurobiology (3 crs.) 

An in depth study of the neuron, its structure and function in the nervous systems of 
invertebrates and vertebrates. Synaptic mechanisms, membrane potentials, sensory 
physiology, motor functions, reflex mechanisms limbic or emotional brain, learning and 
memory and central functions are some of the topics to be covered. (Prerequisites: BI 
100, CH 131 & 132 and a Physiology course or consent of Instructor) 

BI 584 Ethology (3 crs.) 

Behavioral adaptations of animals to their environment and way of life. Introduction to 
the objective analysis of behavior patterns and the use of patterns of behavior in clarifying 
evolutionary relationships. Students will carry out an independent investigation in 
ethology. Two hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. (Prerequisites: 
Undergraduate background in Biology and graduate status) 

Department of Earth Sciences & Geography (Page 107) 

GE 474 Quantitative Geography (2 crs.) 

The use of statistical techniques, and computer and model building methodology to 
analyze various spatial phenomena. (Prerequisite: MA 110 or consent of the Instructor) 

Department of Educational Leadership and Administration 

(Page 116) 

SA 515 Contract Administration for Educational Leaders (3 crs.) 

Combining theory with practice, this course introduces labor relations in the public 
sector and provides potential and veteran administrators with opportunities to attain 
and/or update managerial skills relating to the adminstration of negotiated agreements. 
Topics include the historical, political, and legal context of labor relations; contract 
administration and grievance arbitration as methods of conflict resolution; situational 
leadership grievances; arbitration hearings; rules of construction commonly utilized by 
arbitrators governing such matters as timeliness, discipline, evaluation, seniority and the 
like. (Prerequisite: SA 510 or ED 570, or the consent of the Instructor) 



11 



Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 

(Page 121) 

EE 592 Practicum - Elementary Education (12 crs.) 

This graduate level practicum involves supervised experiences in classroom activities. 
Experiences gained in teaching techniques, individual differences and classroom 
management. Opportunities available in a variety of instructional environments. 
Supervision by the cooperating teacher and college supervisor. Full time for either one 
quarter or a full semester. Either semester (Prerequisite: Acceptance and good standing 
in Teacher Preparation Program) 

EE 593 Internship - Elementary Education (6 crs.) 

In this graduate level internship, a minimum of 30 clock hours will be required in grades 1- 
6 setting as an elementary teacher. Internship must be less than full time but at least 1/5 
time employment as an elementary school teacher. Request for this course must be made 
to the Professional Education Office. (Prerequisite: Consent of the Department) 

EE 596 Practicum - Early Childhood Education (12 crs.) 

This graduate level practicum involves an eight or fifteen week field experience at the K-2 
level under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and a college supervisor. Opportunities 
for participation in pupil observation, program planning and utilization of contemporary 
teaching strategies. Either semester (Prerequisite: Acceptance and good standing in 
Teacher Preparation Program) 

EE 597 Practicum - Preschool (6 crs.) 

This graduate level practicum involves supervised student teaching experience in a 
preschool setting with children, infancy through age five. Emphasis on development, 
implementation and evaluation of innovative preschool programs. The student 
participates in a total program, five days a week for eight weeks in either Day Care 
Center, Nursery School or Head Start Program. Either semester (Prerequisite: 
Acceptance and good standing in Teacher Preparation Program) 

EE 598 Internship - Early Childhood Education (6 crs.) 

This graduate level internship involves a minimum of 300 clock hours in a N-3 grade 
setting as an early childhood teacher. Internship must be less than full time but at least 
1/5 time employment as an early childhood teacher. Request for this course must be 
made to the Professional Education Office. (Prerequisite: Consent of the Department) 

Department of Foreign Languages (Page 138) 

PL 324 Applied Linguistics in the Teaching of Foreign Languages (3 crs.) 

The course will treat first, second and foreign language learning in home and educational 
settings. Emphasis is placed on differences between linguistic and pedagogical grammars, 
strong versus weak contrastive hypotheses and on the notion transitional competence. 
Research techniques are analyzed. (Prerequisite: A minimum of 18 credits in the foreign 
language in which certification is sought.) 

Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

(Page 144) 

PE/CT 156 Movement and Dance for Actors (3 crs.) 

The exploration of Force, the dramatic element of movement in Dance and Drama. 
Dance in relation to the spatial environment, lighting, vocal and instrumental sound, 
costuming and masks. Spring semester 



12 



PE 409 Planning, Implementing and Evaluating Fitness Programs (3 crs.) 

This course provides students with skills needed to develop, implement and evaluate 
programs in fitness and rehabilitative exercise centers. Emphasis will be placed on 
program development, on providing instruction to individuals and groups and on 
administrative tasks expected of the entry level fitness professional. (Prerequisites: PE 
201, PE404) 

Department of High School, Middle School and Adult Education 

(Page 161) 

ED 430 Strategies for Teaching Drama in the High School (3 crs.) 

Strategies including methods, materials and media, for teaching drama are studied. 
Developing competency and versatility is stressed through simulations and guided 
teaching in area high schools. (Prerequisites: ED 230, ED 360, ED 370) 

ED 590 Practicum - High School (12 crs.) 

Graduate students are assigned appropriate student teaching stations where they work in 
an approved situation under an experienced supervising teacher. This is a practical 
experience for one semester in a public school where student teachers are functioning as 
professional teachers. A college supervisor visits to assist the student teacher. Seminars 
may be held to exchange experiences. Students are expected to carry a minimum 
responsible teaching load equal to 50% of the regular teacher's assignment. Full time for 
one semester. (Prerequisite: Acceptance and good standing in Teacher Preparation 
Program, ED 412-426 or ED 440) Either semester 

ED 591 Internship in High School Education (6 crs.) 

A minimum of 300 clock hours will be required in a 9-12 grade setting as a high school 
teacher. Internship must be less than full time but at least 1/5 time employment in the 
role for which certification will be sought. Request for this course must be made to the 
Department and the Professional Education Office. (Prerequisite: Consent of the 
Department) 

Department of History (Page 175) 
HI/RE 312 History and Religion (3 crs.) 

This course traces the development of Christian beginnings from the birth of Christ to 
the Council of Nicaea in 325 A.D. It intends to examine the cultural, social, intellectual, 
political and religious climate in the Roman Empire out of which Christianity sprang, the 
problems the eady Christians encountered, and the Christian reaction to these problems. 
(Prerequisite: HI 111) 

HI 389 America at War in the 20th Century (3 crs.) 

An examination of America's four wars in the context of diplomacy, strategy, politics and 
economic and social change. (Prerequisite: HI 221 or HI 222) 

Department of Management and Aviation Science (Page 184) 

AS 215 Single Engine Flight Simulator Instruction (1-3 crs.) 

Single engine flight simulated instruction is conducted with the use of a flight simulator. 
The course content will be determined in accordance with the flight experience of the 
student. A student must enroll for a minimum of one credit. The course may be repeated 
for a maximum of three credits. (Fifteen hours of instruction are required for one credit.) 
(Prerequisite: AS 105 or permission of Instructor) Either semester 

AS 217 Air Traffic Control (3 crs.) 

This course deals with the U.S. air traffic and airway system as it exists today. Topics of 
discussion will include: Components of the System; Air Route Traffic Control Centers; 
Towers; Flight Service Stations: Navigational Aids; and the Low/High Altitude Federal 
Airway Structure. (Prerequisite: AS 105) 



13 



AS 316 Multi-Enginc Flight Simulator Instruction (1-3 credits) 

Multi-Engine flight simulated instruction is conducted with the use of a flight simulator. 
The course content will be determined in accordance with the flight experience of the 
student. Students must enroll for a minimum of one credit. The course may be repeated 
for a maximum of three credits. (Fifteen hours of instruction are required for one credit.) 
(Prerequisite: AS 413 or permission of Instructor) Either semester 

AS 499 Directed Study in Aviation Science (1-3 crs.) 

Open to junior and senior majors who have demonstrated critical and analytical abilities 
in their studies and who wish to pursue a project independently. May be taken twice for a 
maximum of six credits. (Prerequisite: Consent of department; Formal application 
required) Either semester 

MG 375 Personnel Development (3 crs.) 

The course introduces the student to the concepts of industrial and service training and 
will focus on the skills needed to perform the four roles of the training and development 
function: Administrator, Consultant, Design of Learning Experiences and Instructor. 
(Prerequisite: MG 140) 

MG 475 Statistical Process Control (3 crs.) 

The application of statistical methods to the control of product quality and process 
efficiency is increasingly important in both product manufacturing and in the service 
industries. Statistical lot sampling plans, statistical process control limits and the 
collection and evaluation of process performance data are presented in this course. 
(Prerequisite: MG 370) 

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (Page 196) 

CS 436 Computer Graphics (3 crs.) 

This course includes an introduction to hardware, algorithms, and software of computer 
graphics. Topics include line generators, affine transformations, line and polygon clipping, 
splines, interactive techniques, menus, orthographic and perspective projections, solid 
modeling, hidden surface removal, lighting models and shading. (Prerequisites: CS 330 
and either MA 120 or MA 202) 

Department of Music (Page 213) 

MU 111 Marching Band (1 cr.) 

The Marching Band is open by audition to all students. The Marching Band will perform 
standard and contemporary literature of the repertoire selected to showcase the 
strengths of the ensemble. This course may be repeated for credit. Fall semester 

MU 112 Concert Band (1 cr.) 

The Concert Band is open by audition to any student. The Concert Band performs the 
standard and contemporary literature of the repertoire selected to showcase the 
strengths of the ensemble. The course may be repeated for credit. Spring semester 

MU 113 Stage Band (1 cr.) 

A performing group limited to twenty students in a laboratory experience which stresses 
basic musicianship, analysis of form and style, ensemble playing, and improvisation. One 
three-hour period weekly. (Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor) Either semester 

MU 114 Symphony Orchestra (1 cr.) 

The symphony orchestra is open by audition to all students of the college. The orchestra 
performs standard and contemporary literature to showcase the strengths of the ensem- 
ble. The course may be repeated for credit. Either semester 

MU 121, 221, 321, 421 Performance Studies (Private Lessons - Brass) (1 or 2 crs.) 

The course sequence provides private instruction for those students who wish to improve 
their proficiency in playing brass instruments. The material is selected according to the 
ability of the student. The lessons are for one half hour or one hour periods per week. 
The course may be repeated for credit. Additional fee required. (Prerequisite: Consent - 
placement level determined by Instructor) Either semester 



14 



MU 122, 222, 322, 422 Performance Studies (Private Lessons - Percussion) 
(1 or 2 crs.) 

The course sequence provides private instruction for those students who wish to improve 
their proficiency in playing percussion instruments. The material is selected according to 
the ability of the student. The lessons are for one half hour or one hour periods per week. 
The course may be repeated for credit. Additional fee required. (Prerequisite: Conser\t - 
placement level determined by Instructor) Either semester 

MU 123, 223, 323, 423 Performance Studies (Private Lessons - Violin, Viola) 
(1 or 2 crs.) 

The course sequence provides private instruction in violin and viola for those students 
who wish to improve their proficiency in playing upper string instruments. The material is 
selected according to the ability of the student. The lessons are for one half hour or one 
hour periods per week. The course may be repeated for credit. Additional fee required. 
(Prerequisite: Consent - placement level determined by Instructor) Either semester 

MU 124, 224, 324, 424 Performance Studies (Private Lessons - Woodwinds) 
(1 or 2 crs.) 

The course sequence provides private instruction for those students who wish to improve 
their proficiency in playing woodwind instruments. The material is selected according to 
the ability of the student. The lessons are for one half hour or one hour periods per week. 
The course may be repeated for credit. Additional fee required. (Prerequisite: Consent - 
placement level determined by Instructor) Either semester 

MU 125, 225, 325, 425 Performance Studies (Private Lessons - Classical Guitar) 
(1 or 2 crs.) 

The course sequence provides private instruction in classical guitar for those students 
who wish to improve their proficiency in playing the instrument. The material is selected 
according to the ability of the student. The lessons are for one half hour or one hour 
periods per week. The course may be repeated for credit. Additional fee required. 
(Prerequisite: Consent - placement level determined by Instructor) Either semester 

MU 126, 226, 326, 426 Performance Studies (Private Lessons - Cello, Bass) 
(1 or 2 crs.) 

The course sequence provides private instruction in cello and bass for those students 
who wish to improve their proficiency in playing string instruments. The material is 
selected according to the ability of the student. The lessons are for one half hour or one 
hour periods per week. The course may be repeated for credit. Additional fee required. 
(Prerequisite: Consent - placement level determined by Instructor) Either semester 

MU 130 Voice Class I (3 crs.) 

Through the performance of songs of different nationalities and languages the student 
gains knowledge of basic vocal technique, general musicianship, terminology and cultural 
differences. Satisfies the GER in Artistic Modes of Expression (studio course). Either 
semester 

MU 131, 231, 331, 431 Performance Studies (Private Lessons - Voice - Singing) 
(1 or 2 crs.) 

The course sequence provides private instruction in voice for those students who wish to 
improve their ability in singing. The material is selected according to the ability of the 
student. The lessons are for one half hour or one hour periods per week. The course may 
be repeated for credit. Additional fee required. (Prerequisite: Consent - placement level 
determined by Instructor) Either semester 

MU 141, 241, 341, 441 Performance Studies (Private Lessons - Piano) (1 or 2 crs.) 

The course sequence provides private instruction in piano for those students who wish to 
improve their ability at the keyboard. The material is selected according to the ability of 
the student. The lessons are for one half hour or one hour periods per week. The course 
may be repeated for credit. Additional fee required. (Prerequisite: Consent - placement 
level determined by Instructor) Either semester 

MU 183 String Ensemble (1 cr.) 

The String Ensemble is open by audition to all students of the college. The group 
performs standard and contemporary chamber music selected to showcase the strengths 
of the ensemble. The course may be reF)eated for credit. Either semester 



15 



Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies (Page 217) 



PL 303 Great Philosophers III (3 crs.) 

This course examines the central ideas of Hegel's philosophy and the response to it in 
modern European thought, e.g. in the writings of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Marx, the 
Existentialists, Ricceur, and Gadamer. (Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy) 

PL 304 Great Philosophers IV (3 crs.) 

This course examines the general aim of the last hundred years of Anglo-American 
thought to make philosophy scientific — as seen, for instance, in the realism of Peirce, 
the "analysis" of Russell, the pragmatism of James, the "instrumentalism" of Dewey, the 
ordinary-language philosophy of Wittgenstein, and the naturalism of Quine. (Prerequisite: 
One course in Philosoph]^) 

PL 360 Amoralism, Egoism, and Altruism (3 crs.) 

This course discusses amoralism, egoism, and altruism as alternative rational life plans. It 
addresses issues as the meaning of the good of the self, strategies of self-interest, 
interpersonal compatibility, and the defensibility of ultimate commitments. 

RE 200 The Life of Jesus (3 crs.) 

This course studies the historical, sociological and religious significance of the life of Jesus 
of Nazareth. The recorded events of his life will be examined as to their truth and 
meaning. Some questions that will be raised: Can we know the Jesus of history or only 
the Jesus of faith? Was Jesus the Jewish Messiah? What was his religious message? Why 
has his life so profoundly affected human history? 

RE 210 Women in Third World Religion (3 crs.) 

This course will examine the attitudes, structures, doctrines, ethics, images and symbols 
of eastern, western and various third-world religious traditions as they reflect an 
understanding of women and as they are shaped by and help shape the social relations in 
which we all exist. 

RE 230 Afro-American Religion (3 crs.) 

This course examines the development of the Black religious experience from slavery to 
the present. The focus will be tracing the contribution of African cultural forms to the 
creation of Black Christianity as it emerged in a context of social, political and economic 
oppression and on analyzing third-world issues and perspectives in Black theology. 

RE 310 Religion and the Literary Imagination (3 crs.) 

In this course a close reading of selected texts (novels, short stories, poetry) will focus on 
what might be called religious meanings and possibilities, such as, the sense of the 
"character" of ultimate reality, the nature of the "really" human, the question of "oughts", 
issues of purpose, duty, death, evil, spirituality, and the flesh. 

RE/HI 312 History and Religion (3 crs.) 

This course traces the development of Christian beginnings form the birth of Christ to 
the Council of Niacea in 325 A.D. It intends to examine the cultural, social, intellectual, 
political and religious climate in the Roman Empire out of which Christianity sprang, the 
problems the early Christians encountered, and the Christian reaction to these problems. 
(Prerequisite: HI 111) 

Department of Physics (Page 223) 

PH 498 Internship in Physics (3-15 crs.) 

Laboratory experience in industrial or government laboratories, or academic laboratories 
at other instititutions. (Prerequisite: Consent of Department) Either semester 

Department of Political Science (Page 228) 

PO 338/339 Honors Tutorial in Political Science (3 crs.) 

Special Topics in Political Science. Open to All-College and Departmental Honors 
students. (Prerequisite: Consent of the Department of Political Science) 



16 



PO 388 The Politics of the Communist World (3 crs.) 

This course will introduce the student to the political development of a number of 
communist societies such as those of the Soviet Union, countries of Eastern Europe, the 
People's Republic of China and the relationships between these states. Also included will 
be analysis of political and social differences as well as similarities. (Prerequisite: PO 371) 

PO 485 Honors Thesis in Political Science (3 crs.) 

This course is open to All-College and Departmental Honors students. One-hour weekly 
meetings with the thesis director will culminate in an honors thesis. With the consent of 
the Departmental Honors Committee and the thesis director, this course may be 
extended into a second semester for three additional credits depending upon the scope of 
the project. Whether the final version of the thesis qualifies the student to graduate with 
Honors will be determined by the Departmental Honors Committee. (Prerequisite: 
Consent of the department) Either semester 

Department of Social Work (Page 242) 
SW 150 Introduction to Social Work (3 crs.) 

This course is specifically designed to provide non-majors with a pragmatic introduction 
to the activities, responsibilities and roles which are characteristic in the field of social 
work. In the classroom, learners will have an opportunity to meet a number of 
experienced practioners who will serve as guest lecturers and who will provide 
information on a broad variety of contemporary social work modalities. In addition, field 
visits to social service facilities, both public and private, will be included in the course 
plan. Students will become familiar with the client population and the range of client 
needs currently prevalent in Southeastern Massachusetts, and they will make first-hand 
observation of the ways in which human services are being delivered to meet those 
needs. 

SW 328 Women and Social Services (3 crs.) 

This course will focus on women in social services, both the clients and the workers. It 
will deal with issues and services particularly pertinent to women such as women's health 
care, shelters for battered women, rape-crisis centers, women's centers, and women's 
studies. 

SW 334 Intervention with Family Systems (3 crs.) 

Students will learn to conceptualize personal and interpersonal phenomena from a family 
systems perspective, to think in terms of circular rather than linear causality, and to 
recognize patterns and sequences. Major theoretical family systems approaches will be 
presented, as well as basic intervention techniques. 

SW 335 School Social Work - History, Theory & Issues (3 crs.) 

The course will begin by examining the school as an ecological unit created to educate 
and socialize children, within which unit are various subsystems. The evolution of school 
social work within this system will be traced from its inception in 1906 to the present. The 
three traditional models of school social work will be explored: home/school linkage, 
direct service provider, and team member. Issues of confidentiality, team building and 
assessment and referral will be discussed. The student will acquire an understanding of 
the application of the social work methods of casework, groupwork, and community 
organization as practiced in the school with well children in crisis and with special 
populations and problems (Chapter 766, Chapter I, truancy, minorities, substance abuse, 
destructive behavior, adolescent pregancy). (Prerequisites: SW 250 and SW 311 for 
Social Work majors; SW 250 and Instructor's permission for non-majors) 

Department of Sociology and Anthropology (Page 246) 

AN 208 Anthropology of Women (3 crs.) 

This course will investigate the relative status of women cross-culturally in a range of non- 
western settings, including hunter-gatherer bands, horticultural societies, peasantry, 
nomadic pastoralists as well as contemporary industrial societies. Women will be 



17 



examined as they relate to economic resources, political power and authority, kin and 
non-kin and in religion, myth and lore. Students will analyze conceptually and through 
cross-cultural data what is meant by sex roles, how they vary cross culturally and how 
they are negotiated and maintained. 

AN 400 Anthropological Theory (3 crs.) 

This course is a survey of the foundations of cultural and archaeological theory, including 
cultural evolutionism, structuralism, American historical-particularis, British functionalism 
and structional-functionalism, French Structuralism, and current directions in American, 
European and Third World Anthropological thought. Theories of Archaeology will also be 
examined, including traditional evolutionary perspectives; the New Archaeology, and 
contemporary critiques, drawing upon social systems analysis. (Prerequisites: AN 100 
and AN 101 or AN 103) 

SO 217 East Asian Societies: China & Japan (3 crs.) 

This course examines the cultural and social structure of traditional and modern China 
and Japan. The course will focus on topics such as work and economy, rural-urban 
contrasts, family and kinship, the position of women, and the relationships between state 
and society. The course will conclude with an assessment of the positions of these two 
societies in the contemporary world. (Prerequisite: SO 102 or AN 100) 

SO 333 Sociology of Conflict Resolution (3 crs.) 

The course is designed to study the structure and process of social conflict, and to 
analyze the primary dispute resolution processes, including negotiation and mediation, 
and other institutionalized modes of conflict resolution such as the ombudsman. The role 
of the mediator will be examined in depth. Sociological theory and methods will provide 
the foundation while specific problem-solving approaches are addressed. 

SO 385 Victimology: Sociology of Victims (3 cr.) 

This course is organized to address the significant questions of the victimologist 
perspective: who are victims in specific types of crimes, and how do they become 
victims? What role do victims play in their own victimization? Are there victimless 
crimes? How are victims treated by the police, the courts and related agencies? What can 
the criminal justice system do for the victims? Should victims participate in the sentencing 
process? Should victims be compensated and, if so, by whom? (Prerequisites: SO 102 
arxd SO 328) 

SO 403 Social Data Analysis (3 crs.) 

This course introduces students to computer-based, quantitative data analysis. The 
course focuses on the major statistical techniques used in sociology and anthropology 
and will emphasize data analysis in the context of substantive research problems. Topics 
covered include: microcomputer-based data analysis packages, choosing appropriate 
statistics, interpreting statistical results, and presenting research findings. (Prerequisites: 
Either SO 102 and SO 402 or AN 100 and AN 103) 

Department of Special Education (Page 254) 

SE 422 Teaching Strategies for Students with Severe Special Needs (3 crs.) 

This course will present historical developments, current definitions, assessment 
procedures and behavioral factors. Emphasis will be placed on educational programming, 
systematic instruction and an overview of curriculum. 

Department of Speech Communication, Theatre Arts and 
Communication Disorders (Page 261) 



CC 343 Nonverbal Communication (3 crs.) 

This course is designed to provide the student with theoretical knowledge and practical 
analytical application of the field of Nonverbal Communication and its importance in the 
field of communication. (Prerequisites: CC 130, CC 250, CC 260) 



18 



CC 420 Mass Communication Rules and Regulations (3 crs.) 

This course provides an examination of the rules and regulations that pertain to the mass 
communication industries. The course will review federal agencies such as the FCC and 
the FTC and applicable State and Federal laws. (Prerequisite: CC 320 or the equivalent 
or permission of the Instructor) 

CT/PE 156 Movement and Dance for Actors (3 crs.) 

The exploration of Force, the dramatic element of movement in Dance and Drama. 
Dance in relation to the spatial environment, lighting, vocal and instrumental sound, 
costuming and masks. Spring semester 

CT 211 Voice Production for Theatre (3 crs.) 

This course provides an analysis of each student's vocal habits in performance. Exercises 
which concentrate on good vocal habits and techniques for the performing artist, training 
in physical perception of the sounds of "good American speech" and manipulation of the 
variables of speech for stage interpretation are included. An introduction to the vocal 
performance of Shakespeare is performed. 

CT 247 Performing the Musical (3 crs.) 

The course is a laboratory experience in the performance of musical theatre. The student 
will study the aspects of movement, singing, and acting as they are unique to musical 
theatre performance. Songs, dances, and scenes will be staged; directed and critiqued. 

CT 343 Acting for the Camera (3 crs.) 

This course develops specialized techniques necessary for performance as an actor for 
film or television. (Prerequisite: CC 210 or CT 211; CC 215 recommended) 

CT 346 Voice & Dialect for the Stage (3 crs.) 

This course explores and provides practice in vocal training techniques; development of 
student's skills in analyzing and duplicating various production styles, as well as foreign 
dialects for performance. (Prerequisites: CT 115, CT 242; CT 210 or CC 210) 

CT 432 Directing II (3 crs.) 

This course considers the principles of direction and various theories of direction with 
practical experience in directing scenes for the stage. (Prerequisites: CT 115, CT 221, CT 
332) 

CT 455 Audition Techniques (3 crs.) 

This course explores and practices audition theory and techniques. Audition pieces of 
various styles and periods will be developed and critiqued. Different formats for auditions 
will be utilized. (Prerequisites: CC 210, CT 115, CT 150, CT 241, and CT 242) 

CT 497 Advanced Individual Projects (1-3 crs.) 

The student contracts with faculty to explore learning activities of a creative nature 
beyond the scope of regular course offerings. (Prerequisites: Junior standing. Consent of 
faculty supervisor; course prerequisites required depend on project.) 



Multidisciplinary Programs (Page 273) 



BH 304 The Psychosocial Development of Women (3 crs.) 

This course will provide an introduction to "women's reality" in terms of current research 
on women's values and needs. The course will cover such topics as power and conflict, 
sexuality and intimacy, creativity, ethnicity and the effects of oppression as well as the 
emotional problems which appear to affect women - e.g., depression, eating disorders, 
etc. (Prerequisites: For Social Work majors, SW 310. Otherwise, consent of Instructor) 

ID 330 Issues and Perspectives in Women's Studies (3 crs.) 

The purpose of the course is to explore in depth a subject incidentally treated in a 
department or traditional course. The subject will vary depending on the instructor but 
may be one of the following: Women and Health; Managerial Women; Women in Art; 
Women and Work; Women in Politics; Biological Determinism and Cultural Conditioning; 
Race, Sex and Gender; Aesthetics and Feminism; Feminism and Christianity; Women in 
Science; Women's Roles in Primitive Cultures; Women in Latin America; Images of 
Women in Media. (May be taken twice) fPrerequisife.- ID 230) 



19 



ID 430 Seminar: Research Theory and Methods in Women's Studies (3 crs.) 

To inquire into what it means to be a woman or a man, one must understand the various 
contexts in which to formulate definitions and make analyses. The seminar will present 
research techniques and theories of inquiry, examining assumptions in research, methods 
and conduct of inquiry, interpretation of data, publication and critical evaluation of 
research. Students will conduct their own research project having examined the current 
state of research in their disciplines. (Prerequisite: ID 230) 

NS 514 Scientific Telecommunications (2-6 crs.) 

An introduction to the uses of personal-computer-based electronic telecommunication 
techniques and the applications of these techniques to the sciences. The following topics 
will be considered: Microcomputers, serial interfaces, modems, communications 
software, bulletin board software, communication protocols, message transfer, file 
transfer, text editing, microcomputer to mainframe, and scientific calculations. If the 
course is taken for more than 2.0 credits, a project will be required. (Prerequisite: CH 512 
or permission of Instructor) 



20 



BRIDGEWATER STATE COLLEGE 
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1988-1989 



FALL SEMESTER 1988-1989 


SEPTcMdcR 




5 (Monday) 


Laoor Day — NU ULAbbbo 


6 (Tuesday) 


Registration/Orientation 


7 (Wednesday) 


Classes Begin at 8:00 a.m. 


28 (Wednesday) 


Fall Convocation — 3:00 p.m. 


UU 1 UDCrf 




lO (Monday) 


Columbus Day — NU CLAbbhb 


28 (Friday) 


End of First Quarter 


NOVEMdcR 




II (rriaay) 


veteran s uay — nu ULAbbtb 


23 (Wednesday) 


Thanksgiving Recess begins at the 




close of classes 


^0 (Monaay; 


Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. 


UcUcMDcn 




14 (Wednesday) 


Friday Schedule of Classes 




(8:00 a.m. — 3:00 p.m. classes only) 


14 (Wednesday) 


First Semester Classes End 


15 (Thursday) 


Reading Day — NO CLASSES 


16 (Friday) 


First Semester Examinations Begin 


22 (Thursday) 


First Semester Examinations End 


23 (Friday) 


Snow Day — Final Examinations 



SPRING SEMESTER 1988-1989 



JANUARY 




10 


(Tuesday) 


Registration/Orientation (New Students) 


11 


(Wednesday) 


Registration/Orientation (New Students) 


16 


(Monday) 


Martin Luther King Day — NO CLASSES 


17 


(Tuesday) 


Classes begin at 8:00 a.m. 


FEBRUARY 




1 


(Wednesday) 


Winter Commencement 


20 


(Monday) 


Washington's Birthday — NO CLASSES 


21 


(Tuesday) 


Monday Schedule of Classes 






(8:00 a.m. — 3:00 p.m. classes only) 


MARCH 




10 


(Friday) 


End of Third Quarter — Spring Recess 






begins at close of classes 


17 


(Friday) 


Evacuation Day 


27 


(Monday) 


Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. 


APRIL 




17 


(Monday) 


Patriot's Day — NO CLASSES 


MAY 






16 


(Tuesday) 


Second Semester Classes End 


17 


(Wednesday) 


Reading Day — NO CLASSES 


18 


(Thursday) 


Second Semester Examinations Begin 


24 


(Wednesday) 


Second Semester Examinations End 


27 


(Saturday) 


Commencement 


29 


(Monday) 


Memorial Day 



BRIDGEWATER 

STATE COLLEGE 



Bridgewater, MA 02325 




Supplement to the 

1987-1988 
U N DERGR ADUATE/GR ADUATE 
CATALOGUE 



hiss KATHLEEN M NERN! 
I T.BRARY ASSISTANT I 
LIBRARY SERVICES 
MAXWELL LIBRARY